POLL: Is America Obligated To Accept Muslim Refugees?


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Trump’s revised Muslim ban has been given the green light, along with some protections from minor court interference, after the Supreme Court voted to give the ban full and immediate power and Liberals couldn’t be more upset.

Democrats have long criticized President Trump’s efforts to tighten security and limit America’s risk to terrorist inspired attacks, such as what has been seen in Europe. Many liberals not only believe that America is obligated to take in refugees, but that we are morally obligated to accept millions more than have been accepted in Europe.

After what has been witnessed from those naive enough to accept these ‘refugees’, it is clear that such actions would be foolish and detrimental to our National Security.

Do you believe that America is obligated to accept Muslim refugees?

The first U.S. Supreme Court debate over President Donald Trump’s so-called travel ban took place this week, and while justices won’t make a ruling until June, the decision is playing out at a time in which the refugee crisis in one of the impacted countries, Syria, may be getting worse.

The justices heard arguments Wednesday over the the administration’s ban on travel from five countries with majority Muslim populations — Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen. This follows U.S. missile strikes this month in Syria in retaliation for a reported chemical weapons attack near Damascus.

While missile strikes may be exacerbating the refugee crisis in Syria, the United States has accepted just 11 Syrian refugees this year, compared to over 15,000 in 2016 and over 3,000 in 2017, according to State Department figures.

All of which leads to a pressing question: what obligation, if any, does America have to refugees fleeing countries where the United States is engaged militarily?

The ‘Pottery Barn rule’

There is no legal obligation or provision in international law that requires a country to take in refugees, even in a case of war, says Ryan Crocker, who has served as a U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Syria and Lebanon.

But despite the lack of legal obligation, Crocker says that from 1945 onward, America has played a role of “international leadership” in refugee resettlement from countries where U.S. military forces were directly involved.

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